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Radon Testing

EPA recommends that you hire a qualified professional to test for radon when you are buying or selling a home. Some states require radon measurement testers to follow a specific testing protocol. If you hire a contractor to test your residence, protect yourself by hiring a qualified individual or company.

What is Radon? 

Radon is a radioactive gas. It is colorless, odorless, tasteless, and chemically inert. Unless you test for it, there is no way of telling how much is present.

Radon is formed by the natural radioactive decay of uranium in rock, soil, and water. Naturally existing, low levels of uranium occur widely in Earth's crust. It can be found in all 50 states. Once produced, radon moves through the ground to the air above. Some remains below the surface and dissolves in water that collects and flows under the ground's surface.

What is the "acceptable" level of radon in air?

The EPA states that any radon exposure carries some risk(link is external); no level of radon exposure is always safe. However, the EPA recommends homes be fixed if an occupant's long-term exposure will average 4 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) or higher.

What is a "picocurie" (pCi)?

A pCi is a measure of the rate of radioactive decay of radon. One pCi is one trillionth of a Curie, 0.037 disintegrations per second, or 2.22 disintegrations per minute. Therefore, at 4 pCi/L (picocuries per liter, the EPA's recommended action level), there will be approximately 12,672 radioactive disintegrations in one liter of air during a 24-hour period.

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Why should I test my home for radon?

Radon is widely believed to be the second leading cause of lung cancer. Therefore, the EPA and the Surgeon General recommend testing for radon in all homes below the third floor.

Radon has been found in homes all over the United States. Any home can have a radon problem. On average, one out of every fifteen U.S. homes have a problem. The only way to know whether or not your home has a radon problem is to test for it.

Who can test a building for Radon?

EPA recommends that you hire a qualified professional to test for radon when you are buying or selling a home. Some states require radon measurement testers to follow a specific testing protocol. If you hire a contractor to test your residence, protect yourself by hiring a qualified individual or company.

Contact us today to have your home tested for Radon!